Find the most unusual doll of the 119 on display at the Fowler Museum. That number isn’t fixed because the display is dynamic, and which of them is most unusual is a judgment call, but do visit the museum. The dolls’ ages span at least 60 years, and they are in many sizes and appearances.

Find the most unusual doll of the 119 on display at the Fowler Museum. That number isn’t fixed because the display is dynamic, and which of them is most unusual is a judgment call, but do visit the museum. The dolls’ ages span at least 60 years, and they are in many sizes and appearances.

There is Eppy, called weird and creepy in eBay ad (at $29). There are about ten Horsman dolls, known for their baby and toddler physiques. There are Ideal, Egee, Vogue, Fisher-Price, Mattel and many with no brand names. There is a kewpie doll made in Japan and many late 1900s dolls made in Hong Kong. There is a Gerber doll, a doll made by Sun Rubber company, and many more.

There are bisque dolls from mid-1900s and earlier, and they include bride dolls in appropriate attire. Jo Barnard collected dolls for about 40 years. Her granddaughter, Brinda Wohlgemuth says there are so many because her grandmother and another Fowler resident were in competition. The granddaughter recalls that they needed to be at sales events early to arrive ahead of the competition. If they arrived at the same time, she with the quickest feet and hands collected the prize.

Some of the dolls have original clothing. Many are wearing hand-me-downs. Some are lucky enough to have fine frocks made by Charlene Turner. Others have improvised apparel. This collection is likely to stimulate memories from the past century!

An addition to this display is Rogene Smith’s collection of Shirley Temple dolls. These classy dolls are worth a jaunt to the museum in themselves. The display will remain for a few weeks. The museum is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and sometimes on Friday.