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Morning Minutes: July 2

 

Word of the Day, Website of the Day, Number to Know, This Day in History, Today’s Featured Birthday and Daily Quote.

 

Word of the Day

Nictitate NIK-tuh-tayt (verb) Wink - www.merriam-webster.com

Website of the Day

American Life
www.america.gov/amlife.html

In the days leading up to the Fourth of July, visit this site to read about the people, places and culture that help our great country thrive. Check out the blogs and photo galleries, and participate in upcoming Webchats.

Number to Know

$98.3 billion: Dollar value of trade between the United States and the United Kingdom, making the British, our adversary in 1776, our sixth-leading trading partner today. – Census.gov

This Day in History

July 2, 1937: Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan are last heard from over the Pacific Ocean while attempting to make the first equatorial round-the-world flight.

Today’s Featured Birthday

Actor/writer Larry David (65)

Daily Quote

“We on this continent should never forget that men first crossed the Atlantic not to find soil for their ploughs but to secure liberty for their souls.” - Robert J. McCracken

 

Morning Minutes: July 3

 

Word of the Day, Website of the Day, Number to Know, This Day in History, Today’s Featured Birthday and Daily Quote.

 

Word of the Day

Mumblety-peg MUM-bul-tee-peg (noun) A game in which the players try to flip a knife from various positions so that the blade will stick into the ground - www.merriam-webster.com

Website of the Day

Independence Hall
http://www.ushistory.org/tour/tour_indhall.htm

Get ready for July Fourth with a tour of Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, the building in which the Declaration of Independence was adopted. There is tons of cool trivia, and you can browse the site for other historic Philadelphia landmarks.

Number to Know

6.8 billion pounds: Total production of cattle and calves in Texas in 2010. Chances are good that the beef hot dogs, steaks and burgers on your backyard grill came from the Lone Star State, which accounted for about one-sixth of the nation's total production. And if the beef did not come from Texas, it very well may have come from Nebraska (4.6 billion pounds) or Kansas (4.1 billion pounds). - USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service

This Day in History

July 3, 1986: President Ronald Reagan presides over the relighting of the renovated Statue of Liberty.

Today’s Featured Birthday

Actor Tom Cruise (50)

Daily Quote

“Where liberty dwells, there is my country.” - Benjamin Franklin

 

Morning Minutes: July 4

 

Word of the Day, Website of the Day, Number to Know, This Day in History, Today’s Featured Birthday and Daily Quote.

 

Word of the Day

Pomaceous poh-MAY-shus (adjective) Of or relating to apples; resembling a pome - www.merriam-webster.com

Website of the Day

The National Council on Fireworks Safety
www.fireworksafety.com

It’s just not the Fourth of July without fireworks. But you can still have fun while staying safe. If fireworks are legal in your state, check out this site for tips on using them safely. And find out how to report illegal fireworks.

Number to Know

81 million: Number of Americans who said they have taken part in a barbecue during the previous year. It's probably safe to assume a lot of these events took place on Independence Day. – Census.gov

This Day in History

July 4, 1776: The Declaration of Independence is adopted by the Second Continental Congress.

Today’s Featured Birthday

Playwright Neil Simon (85)

Daily Quote

“From every mountain side
Let freedom ring.” - Samuel F. Smith

 

Morning Minutes: July 5

 

Word of the Day, Website of the Day, Number to Know, This Day in History, Today’s Featured Birthday and Daily Quote.

 

Word of the Day

Banshee BAN-shee (noun) A female spirit in Gaelic folklore whose appearance or wailing warns a family that one of them will soon die - www.merriam-webster.com

Website of the Day

Rent the Runway
www.renttherunway.com

Few women can afford the high-fashion outfits they see on the runway. This site lets you rent designer clothing at a fraction of the retail price. There’s a waiting list to register for the service, but it’s likely worth the wait!

Number to Know

1937: Year when Spam was introduced. It hit the market on this date.

This Day in History

July 5, 1975: Arthur Ashe becomes the first black man to win the Wimbledon singles title.

Today’s Featured Birthday

Musician Huey Lewis (62)

Daily Quote

“If I were to say, ‘God, why me?’ about the bad things, then I should have said, ‘God, why me?’ about the good things that happened in my life.” - Arthur Ashe

 

Morning Minutes: July 6

 

Word of the Day, Website of the Day, Number to Know, This Day in History, Today’s Featured Birthday and Daily Quote.

 

Word of the Day

Secular SEK-yuh-ler (adjective) Of or relating to the worldly or temporal; not overtly or specifically religious; not ecclesiastical or clerical; not bound by monastic vows or rules - www.merriam-webster.com

Website of the Day

Kakorama
www.kakophone.com/kakorama

What happened on the day you were born? Enter your birth date into this site’s search, and you’ll find fun facts, such as the No. 1 song, the Time magazine cover, how old you’d be if you lived on Mars and more.

Number to Know

4-2: Score of the first Major League Baseball All-Star Game, which took place on this date in 1933. The American League won.

This Day in History

July 6, 1957: Althea Gibson wins the Wimbledon championships, becoming the first black athlete to do so.

Today’s Featured Birthday

Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama (77)

Daily Quote

“If you can, help others; if you cannot do that, at least do not harm them.” - Dalai Lama

 

 

Morning Minutes: July 7

 

Word of the Day, Website of the Day, Number to Know, This Day in History, Today’s Featured Birthday and Daily Quote.

 

Word of the Day

Reciprocate rih-SIP-ruh-kayt (verb) To move backward and forward alternately; to give and take mutually; to make a return for something done or given - www.merriam-webster.com

Website of the Day

WatchCount.com
www.WatchCount.com

This site shows you the most popular eBay items in real-time, as voted by registered eBay users. Search by keyword or category to find the most in-demand and most-watched items. Maybe you’ll find something you’d like to bid on.

Number to Know

$7 billion: Amount of money people spend on chocolate per year. Today is Chocolate Day, so make sure you celebrate it by having some!

This Day in History

July 7, 2005: A series of four explosions occurs on London's transport system killing 56 people, including four alleged suicide bombers and injuring over 700 others.

Today’s Featured Birthday

Former Beatle Ringo Starr (72)

Daily Quote

"The value of our good is not measured by what it does, but by the amount of good it does to the one concerned." – Milton Hershey (founder of The Hershey Company)

 

Morning Minutes: July 8

 

Word of the Day, Website of the Day, Number to Know, This Day in History, Today’s Featured Birthday and Daily Quote.

 

Word of the Day

Uncouth un-KOOTH (adjective) Strange or clumsy in shape or appearance; outlandish; lacking in polish and grace; rugged; awkward and uncultivated in appearance, manner or behavior - www.merriam-webster.com

Website of the Day

The Roswell Files
www.roswellfiles.com

On July 8, 1947, news media reported that a UFO crash-landed in Roswell, N.M. Whatever you believe, this site has a comprehensive description of the events that reportedly took place, the people involved, and the theories surrounding the event.

Number to Know

1978: Year when the Roswell incident truly began to become a cultural phenomenon. It happened when Major Jesse Marcel said in an interview that he believed an alien spacecraft had crashed in 1947 (see below).

This Day in History

July 8, 1947: Reports are broadcast that a UFO crash-landed in Roswell, N.M.

Today’s Featured Birthday

Actor Jaden Smith (14)

Daily Quote

“There was all kinds of stuff — small beams about three-eighths or a half-inch-square with some sort of hieroglyphics on them that nobody could decipher. These looked something like balsa wood, and were about the same weight, except that they were not wood at all. They were very hard, although flexible, and would not burn….” - Major Jesse Marcel