Family is very important to most folks and especially at this time of year with Thanksgiving and Christmas just around the corner. Some families travel across the country to see their loved ones. Thanksgiving is usually one of the busiest travel times as its the first time college students get to travel home, especially the freshman class. I’m sure most of them are getting very anxious as the time nears. Not only will they reconnect with their families, but also with friends who might have gone to other schools or attended one close to home.

It’s a time for sharing — sharing our bountiful goodness and helping others who might be “a little down at holiday time,” possibly separated from family.


Family is very important to most folks and especially at this time of year with Thanksgiving and Christmas just around the corner. Some families travel across the country to see their loved ones. Thanksgiving is usually one of the busiest travel times as its the first time college students get to travel home, especially the freshman class. I’m sure most of them are getting very anxious as the time nears. Not only will they reconnect with their families, but also with friends who might have gone to other schools or attended one close to home.
It’s a time for sharing — sharing our bountiful goodness and helping others who might be “a little down at holiday time,” possibly separated from family.
There’s a family in our community that is so good at helping people in difficult times. Their last name is Peacock.
They own and operate Peacock-Larsen Funeral Home and Crematorium in La Junta and also Peacock Funeral Home in Lamar. Since 1938 they have been in the funeral home business in Colorado.
Sam and his wife, Eddie, have been retired from the business for some time. If you don’t know the couple, let me tell you a few things about this terrific family. They’ve always been a great couple, both have a rare gift — a great sense of humor. They are the parents of six children. The age range is from 60 to 48. All of their kids live in Colorado with the exception of the eldest, Sam. Sam and wife, Diana, live in California where he works for the Santa Fe Railroad.
The other siblings are Danny and Cindy Peacock, of Salida, where they are in the restaurant business. Jeannie and George Larsen reside in La Junta and she works for Southeast Mental Health Center as human resources manager. Next comes Clay and Brenda Peacock. Clay runs the funeral home in Lamar. Curtis and wife, Linda, live in La Junta. He operates the La Junta funeral home. And, then there is little sister, Susan and her husband, Kelley Jones of the Swink area. Susan is a teacher in La Junta.
When I look out a window on the south side of the building — I get the chuckles. One afternoon as I was looking out a window there was something to the south, about a block away that caught my eye. There were two youngsters pulling a wagon. They were in the area of Sixth and Colorado. I decided to watch as they came down the sidewalk to see what was in the wagon. Well, it was the two youngest Peacocks, Curtis and Susan. They had a wagon full of pop bottles and I had no idea what they were planning to do with them.
Later in the afternoon, one of my co-workers, Bruce Place and I, met Leo Kipper, owner of Kipper’s Modern Food (next to the newspaper) at the doughnut shop for coffee. I was laughing and telling Bruce and Kipper about the kids. Kipper’s response, “They brought the bottles to my store to SELL!” I thought that was pretty ingenious of these two kids. That same scene happened several times that summer. When I’d see them coming, I’d call Kipper so he’d be ready to pay them off.
When we’d have the kids Christmas programs at the United Methodist Church you could count on the Peacock family being present. Some of the kids liked to do a little entertaining of their own when they were up front. You could look over at Sam’s parents, Ralph and Grace Peacock and see that she would be “a little upset.” They were supposed to be “little angels” in church.
Susan has a special name for me — Phyllis Diller. That’s great Susan, except I don’t make the money that she made. If some of you don’t know who “Phyllis” is — check it on the internet. She was a comedian (maybe she still is).
Another interesting note about Sam and Eddie’s kids — four boys and two girls — the four boys all became morticians. However, only the two are now in the business.
The amazing thing about people who are in this type business is the comfort and love they extend to families during the times they lose family and friends. They console the families, they assist in any way they can.
The last several months I’ve been concerned for the Peacock family. Eddie is battling cancer and I know it’s been hard on the entire family. I just want you all to know my thoughts and prayers go out to you.