Editor's note: The series of these columns is titled [I]ntelligent [Q]uestions.

Six young adults headed to Manitou Springs to attend a Summit Ministries two-week Worldview Conference. Those individuals, Nathan Johnson, Rachel Johnson, Zachary Hubbell, Caleb Johnson, Karianne Kanau and Luke Johnson, have decided to share their findings with our readers.

Editor's note: The series of these columns is titled [I]ntelligent [Q]uestions.

Six young adults headed to Manitou Springs to attend a Summit Ministries two-week Worldview Conference. Those individuals, Nathan Johnson, Rachel Johnson, Zachary Hubbell, Caleb Johnson, Karianne Kanau and Luke Johnson, have decided to share their findings with our readers. Over the next 12 weeks these individuals will present us [I]ntelligent [Q]uestions, where they will introduce and explain worldviews, and then write about the 10 parts of worldview, with the last week presenting a summary.

Summit helped the writers of this column understand why people (including themselves) have the ideas and opinions that they do. "Essentially, we learned how to interpret the world around us," said Nathan Johnson. "We decided to write these articles so that we could share the idea of worldviews with the readers of the Fowler Tribune by asking Intelligent Questions," he added.

This week marks week ten of[I]ntelligent [Q]uestions. If at any time you have feedback or questions about the series we would like to hear it; email them to lmccuistion@ljtdmail.com.

This kind of question seems like it should be easy to answer. If I purchase or make something, it seems to follow that I own it, right? But that is not the case in all societies. If we take a look at some other forms of government, we begin to see some very different ideas about ownership.

I see a couple extremes of government intervention: capitalism and socialism. Our country currently sits between those extremes, in what we call Interventionism.

Capitalism is a pretty straightforward approach — you and you alone are responsible for your property. You own it, and can do what you want with it. If you destroy it, you are the only person who really loses anything.

On the other hand, socialism is complete government intervention. You might have a title on something, but you aren’t responsible for it because you don’t really own it. The government distributes wealth across the whole of society so that one person never has more than another. This could be advantageous because it seems to eliminate the problem of greed. After all, if you have exactly the same amount of wealth, the same car and the same house, what is there to be greedy over?

This sounds like it could be a Utopia. The problem is that people will always find something to be jealous of, no matter how small. If you believe the Bible when it says that humans are by nature sinful beings, then we will always have to deal with jealousy, stealing and envy. In a world where humans actually were inherently good, perhaps we would not have this problem. But as it stands, even something as simple as a smile can make us jealous.

I think that responsibility is one of life’s greatest natural teachers, even though sometimes it hurts to be taught. Without the lessons we learn from personal ownership, society would not understand why it is wrong on such a basic level to take something that is not yours. Can we truly own anything without being responsible for it? Let us be responsible. Let us own it.