Mac vs. PC. The commercials turn it into a religion. So where is the truth already? As usual, the answer comes “somewhere in between.” However, being a true believer can be fun and a way to define yourself.

Mac vs. PC. The commercials turn it into a religion. So where is the truth already?

As usual, the answer comes “somewhere in between.” However, being a true believer can be fun and a way to define yourself.

The fight goes back to an original computer aphorism: What you know is what you love. A Mac user will never switch to a PC. A PC user may be tempted by the trendy Mac ads but put off by the learning curve.

As for computers as a lifestyle, that’s a Mac invention.

Mac still is a small part of the computer market, about 9 percent. That’s one of its biggest hurdles. Software creators seek large markets. It costs the same to program for a Mac as a PC. Which market would you choose?

Still, computing is computing. For 15 years, I’ve used Macs and PCs nearly side-by-side. Computing now is a commodity like white bread.

Frankly, I don’t care which system I’m using. If it does the work, I’m on it.

My Mac cost $2,200. My PC is higher powered for $599. The difference is not quality. My Macs have been as reliable as my PCs. A big part of the price difference is numbers. It’s much cheaper to make a lot of systems than a few.

And then we have the Mac fine design, a lot more elegant than a cookie-cutter PC. Elegance does not increase performance, but hey, some folks drive Porsches and some Kias. Both cars get you there.

My Macs have crashed as often as my PCs. Both have become extremely reliable compared to 10 years ago.

Apple has as much as admitted to its dearth of software problem. You can buy Windows to run on a Mac with a utility that emulates a PC. You pay for that.

Used to be the big argument was the central processor. Mac now runs on Intel, ending that.

Mac users will tell you they do not need virus protection. That’s back to the old numbers game. Most virus writers would rather write for the most common denominator, the 91 percent of the market that is PC.

I would dispute the notion that viruses don’t attack Macs. I’ve suffered as many on my Macs as on my PCs.

The big difference beyond cost is choice. PCs offer a world of software, a lot of it free. Macs prefer to do the work themselves, with their own integrated “i” packages, sold by Mac, of course.

Both systems are inveterate copycats. Something that works well on one soon arrives on the other. So far, Mac has been the leader here.

Apple for its part remains highly rated for customer  support, beating all PC companies. That’s worth something.

Which system is for you? You must look into your inner soul and inner wallet for that.

SPECIAL NOTE

The Microsoft Essentials anti-virus  link at the top of the Yahoo search screen is a paid ad. It redirects the user to www.freezone.com where an offer for Essentials support is made for $20 a year. Spyware is available at $28 per year.

Microsoft does not charge for Essentials or its product support. The program eliminates the need for spyware. The Yahoo ad is designed to look like an authentic link.

The real link is: www.microsoft.com/Security_Essentials/

Jim Hillibish writes for The Repository in Canton, Ohio. Contact him at jim.hillibish@cantonrep.com.